Thursday, November 14, 2013

Managing MS Endurance


This past weekend while hiking in Sedona, I walked more in a single day than I had since 2009—2.9 miles, over 6,200 gimpy steps. Of course I realize this might not sound like much, especially if you do the math. I mean, it would take me nine full record-setting days to accomplish a single marathon, which apparently any remotely athletic Kenyan can run in under three hours. But with multiple sclerosis doing a number on my legs, it’s cause for a minor celebration, like a Snoopy happy dance (sans dance).
Even though these days I'm able to walk for up to 75 minutes straight with my forearm crutches, my legs afterward turn into floppy rubber chickens—the kind you’d see in an old comedy skit. These two appendages that presumably make me a biped are beyond hosed for the rest of the day. The type of hosing that makes you debate whether or not you should have a beer post epic hike. Yes, a beer would be tasty. Yes, a beer would be frosty cold and a just reward. And yes, a beer would make you eventually have to pee, necessitating you to get off the darn couch and walk to the bathroom. On rubber chicken legs. Honestly, at those times dehydration never sounded so good.
After hiking to exhaustion a few times, I figured I had two options if I wanted to maintain healthy levels of hydration and still enjoy cerveza. One, relocate the hall bath so that it was within arm’s length of the couch or two, find a way to avoid rubber chicken legs. With my wife Laura nixing option one in the clearest of terms (or any variation of option one, aka empty Gatorade bottle), I was left with managing my endurance more strategically.
So to prevent blowing up my thighs just to prove, ostensibly to myself, that I can still motor for an hour at a time (Oh, Dave, you are so strong and manly even with your disease), I swallowed that ego deflation pill and figured out how to dole out my energy output: Force myself to take regular breaks.
Now when I hike, my wife/Sherpa unfolds a small camping stool every 15 minutes and I take a 3-5 minute break. Even if I’m feeling fresh. Even if there is a great vista point a few minutes up the trail. Even if there is a hiker doling out free microbrewed beer a switchback ahead. (Thankfully that particular dilemma has never materialized.) These regular, scheduled breaks help to keep the legs from bonking and to avoid the inevitable implosion at the end of a long (for me) hike.
So how did I manage the record 2.9 miles that day? Deliberately and patiently. I hiked a little over a mile in the morning (3300 steps), and then another mile in the late afternoon around sunset—both hikes in cooler weather as I avoided the midday heat. In between I managed to add nearly another mile strolling around seeking food, shelter, and toilets. Again, no marathon sessions, just steady plodding.
With this disease, we all desperately want to be the hare, to prove to ourselves we aren’t that disabled, we aren’t that restricted by our multiple sclerosis. But as Aesop’s fable dutifully preaches, it’s often the tortoise that enjoys the spoils … and gets to celebrate with a happy dance, albeit a slow one.

16 comments:

melissa herlevic said...

I absolutely love this. It has inspired me to get off the couch and go walk on the treadmill.

Dave Bexfield said...

Way to go, Melissa!

Lyla said...

I am prone to want to "ignore" my MS from time to time, with results resembling what you describe Dave! Short rest breaks save the day for me too - the hard part is often acknowledging the fact!

Dave Bexfield said...

Lyla, I know that all too well. But sometimes I'm still too stubborn to rest and then I pay the price.

melissa herlevic said...

I do not like waiting around but I do believe that after having 2 children and getting ms I was forced to slow down. I don't like always but I think it was necessary for me.
Sometimes God and the universe have strange ways of redirecting you but trusting is the key.

Janis Williams said...

Dave,

Just re-discovered your side/blog yeterday. I am inspired again to get back in shape. Unfortunately, I broke my foot 3 weeks ago (thankfully not my ankle!). So I'm going to take the rest of my recuperation off my feet to work on my upper body and core.

I also discoered in the deep recesses of my closet a pair of Leki trekking poles! Now I'm really inspired!

In addition to the "Yay - team - Go!" I got, this post reminded me to be judicious. Rest, patience, and slow but steady. I plan on being the most fit turtle with MS my town knows!

Janis Williams said...

Site. MS & ttyping...

Dave Bexfield said...

Great to see you've rediscovered us, Janis, that happens a lot. Just when you thought you'd gotten rid of me, I pop back into the picture to goad you into exercising just a little bit more. Way to go, Janis, I know you can do it! Turtle it up!

Phyllis Alesia said...

Oh, Dave, thank you! I was once a dedicated urban hiker who was about to embark on some serious wilderness trekking when I was struck with MS symptoms four years ago. Now I get exhausted and rubber-legged just walking up and down the grocery eisle. When I do walk (a couple of blocks, tops) I'm using those long walking poles (they have been a godsend). Your example is like nourishment to me as I continue to adjust and keep going. Keep preaching!

Karen said...

I'm up to walking one mile in about 30 minutes with trekking poles in my neighborhood, then home to rest the legs. With rest breaks every 15 min. maybe I really could make it in the woods again. Encouraging advice. Thank you. Karen in OR

Dave Bexfield said...

Karen, you so could make it into the woods. Let me know how it goes!

Dave Bexfield said...

Thanks Phyllis! I think it is a challenge to always adjust ... and then just when you've got it down, to readjust. Keep it up!

Dick Fate said...

Dave-
I'm an amputee, not an MSer, but we have similar issues. I'm the jointed crutch guy ... Last week, I was at Arches National Park and determined to see the Landscape arch, apparently the longest arch in the world. But a two mile hike stood between me and seeing it. As a high amputee (hip disarticulation), walking isn't easy, particularly with the ups and downs of the trail. You had a stool to rest on; I had my brother's shoulder to stabilize with. At any rate, I was able to see the arch - a big thrill! I think the key for both of us is to simply stay active and to keep pushing.

Dave Bexfield said...

Dick, incredible that you made it all the way to Landscape arch. I've been trying to follow my own rules and have been adventuring all weekend. But my legs are still a touch tired from cycling/walking Friday, and are now fully fried today. Meh, Mondays are for recovery....

Kim Ottosen said...

Okay, I'm ready to try it. Currently, after 6200 steps, I get double vision and a migraine the following day or two. Wondering if I break it up like you do, I can keep my vision. Will try it out in Baja next week!

Dave Bexfield said...

Kim, breaking it up will certainly help. Staying as cool as you can will help too. Have fun in Baja!